Some Things Are Just Too Difficult – Like Geography


The idea for this post initially came in Japanese, which you can read below.  The English version adds more American flavor.

_________________________________________________________________________________

I like history, but not necessarily social science.  I don’t particularly care for Geography and predictably I’m not particularly good at it.

I find it appalling that 1/3 of Americans can’t identify China on an unmarked world map, but then, I’m in no position to critique.  I took a mini Japanese Geography quiz at juku, my Japanese cram school, back in middle school.  I was given an unmarked map of Japan and told to fill in the states (or prefectures as they’re called in Japan).  That I didn’t do well was perfectly consistent with my daily performance so that part wasn’t particularly memorable.  What I got from that experience, though, was the appreciation for how difficult the task is.

Consider, you really need to have two knowledge to complete this task.  First, you need to know where the states are located.  This knowledge is somewhat easier in the United States where (Western) states are huge blocks of land with relatively distinctive shapes.  For example, you’ll never confuse California with Nevada or Idaho with Montana.  Sure, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico all look like standard lego blocks, Wyoming and Montana sort of blur together and Washington and Oregon appear interchangeable, but in general, you should be able to take an educated guess about which states are where.

In Japan, locating the prefectures is much more difficult.  A country smaller than the state of California carved itself into 47 prefectures.  Not surprisingly, they’re all as small as goldfish shit and they all look like it too.  Distinguishing themselves neither in shape nor size, you can’t blame me for being able to properly locate only three prefectures:  Hokkaido, which is a huge bloc of island in the North; Aomori, the prefecture immediately to the south of Hokkaido; and Okinawa, an island even a nincompoop can locate because, like Hawai’i, it’s always presented in a small box due to its geographic isolation.

But alas, location is only half the test.  Next you must be able to correctly write the name of the state or prefecture.  This task is also much easier in English, where sounding out the name gets you fairly close to the correct spelling.  In Japanese, you need to know the Chinese characters, and that’s a black and white question of “Do you know or don’t know?”  I didn’t.  Can you write 沖縄?I sure couldn’t, and still can’t.  I may have known where Okinawa was, but that didn’t help me in the least.

What is the morale of this story, in which I ended up scoring only 4%, correctly locating and filling in the name of  2 of the 47 prefectures?

That some tasks are just too difficult and you might as well throw your hands up, give in and say uncle.

I sure have.

It’s been 10 years, and I doubt I can do any better if I took the same quiz again.

アメリカ人の無知を説明するのによく使われるのが、国民の3分の1が非標の世界地図で中国を特定することができない、という恐ろしい世論調査。中学でこれを聴いたとき、この国の人間はどこまで阿呆なのか、なんて思ったのをよく覚えているが、実は余り人のことは言えない。 

同じく中学ごろだっただろうか?塾で無標の日本地図に正しく都道府県の名を記入するミニテストがあり、北海道と青森しか答えられなかった。 

まあ、言い訳をさせてもらえば、学生生活がほとんどアメリカだったから、日本のことよりアメリカのことのほうが詳しいのは当たり前で、米国の地図を渡されれば50州のうち多分7割から8割は正しく答えられたと思う。(今なら95%ぐらい)。 

そもそも、地理テストというのはいろいろな面で難しい: 

1) 都道府県の位置を知らなければならない。この面では、日本の都道府県地理テストは特に難しい。カルフォニアよりちっぽけな国が、アメリカの州の数と大して変わらない47の犬の糞の大きさの都道府県に区切られているのだから、覚えられるほうが奇跡である。ニュージャージーで家庭教師をしていた家族は愛媛県出身だったのだが、ご主人がなんと愛媛県はニュージャージー州のバーゲン郡より狭いということを教えてくださった。ただでさえ広くないニュージャージーの一部に過ぎないバーゲン郡より小さい県など、さっさと2-3県と統合したほうがいい。 

2) 都道府県の名を正しくかけなければならない。沖縄ぐらいどこにあるか知っていたが、当然のことながら漢字が書けなかった。 http://mixi.jp/view_diary.pl?id=1134718121&owner_id=6223932

漢字が書けても位置が分からないというのが結構あり(東京、京都、石川など)、結局1)も2)も分かったのは北海道と青森だけだった。 

悲しいのが、あのミニテストから10年。現在も大してよい成績は期待できない。ただ卒論の課題が日本の選挙制度だったので、都道府県の大体の位置を11の比例区をもとに知ることができた。群馬県と山梨県が東京都に近いなんて、そうでもなかったら知りません。

Advertisements

4 Responses to “Some Things Are Just Too Difficult – Like Geography”


  1. 1 Jay June 22, 2009 at 7:03 pm

    Joe’s lesson of this post: Give up when things are too hard.

    • 2 joesas June 23, 2009 at 12:48 am

      Oh contraire, mon ami. I merely said “sometimes” give up when things are too hard.

  2. 3 Ray June 25, 2009 at 1:21 am

    お久しぶり!
    日本語でコメントしてもいいですか?笑

    アメリカ国民の3分の1が非標の世界地図で中国を特定することができないって、、、ホント!??

    それって私みたいな普通の日本人からしたら異常なんだけど!

    中学受験で難しいところを受けようとすると、地図のシルエットだけで県名を当てるなんていう問題があるんだよ。

  3. 4 joesas June 25, 2009 at 8:13 pm

    Ray,

    日本語のコメントは大歓迎!Rayが記念すべきお初です。とうとうこのブログも国際化しました。

    そう、ホントにアメリカ人の1/3が中国が何処にあって、どんな形をしてるか知らないんだって。信じられないようだけど、この国に住むと、インテリ層と阿呆層の差のすごさを実感するから、何となく納得しちゃうんだよね。日本では考えられないでしょう?

    中学試験の話を聞くと、またバカらしい事をテストするもんだなーなんて思う。もっと学ぶ価値のある事がこの世の中山ほどあると思う。例えば、ジャームズボンドがどの映画でトルコへ行ったとか。


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Top Rated

Categories

Archives

June 2009
M T W T F S S
« May   Jul »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

%d bloggers like this: